Materials World Modules

An Inquiry & Design-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Program

Nanotechnology Module Module Alignment to Colorado Standards

Nanotechnology Module

CO Science Standards Activities CO Math Standards Activities
Grades 9-12 Designs Grades 9-12

Designs

Scientific Investigation and Design

 

Algebra 1

 

1.1 Scientific Method: ask questions and state hypotheses using prior scientific knowledge to help design and guide development and implementation of a scientific investigation

2a. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions: modeling real-world phenomena (for example, distance-versus-time relationships, compound interest, amortization tables, mortality rates) using functions, equations, inequalities, and matrices;

1.4 Scientific Method: recognize and analyze alternative explanations and models

2c. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions: solving problems involving functional relationships using graphing calculators and/or computers as well as appropriate paper-and-pencil techniques;

1.5 Scientific Method: construct and revise scientific explanations and models, using evidence, logic, and experiments that include identifying and controlling variables 2d. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions: analyzing and explaining the behaviors, transformations, and general properties of types of equations and functions (for example, linear, quadratic, exponential);
Physical Science

 

2.1. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions: identify, describe, analyze, extend, and create a wide variety of patterns in numbers, shapes, and data;

2.1 Chemistry: elements can be organized by their physical and chemical properties (Periodic Table)

2.3. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions : solve problems and model real-world situations using patterns and functions;
2.2 Chemistry: the spatial configuration of atoms and the structure of the atoms in a molecule determine the chemical properties of the substance

2.5. Algebraic methods, model, patterns and functions: describe the connections among representations of patterns and functions, including words, tables, graphs, and symbols.

2.3 Chemistry: there are observable and measurable physical and chemical properties that allow one to compare, contrast, and separate substances (for example: pH, melting point, conductivity, magnetic attraction)

Geometry

 

2.5. Physics: quantitative relationships involved with thermal energy can be identified, measured, calculated and analyzed (for example: heat transfer in a system involving mass, specific heat, and change in temperature of matter)

4a. Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: finding and analyzing relationships among geometric figures using transformations (for example, reflections, translations, rotations, dilations) in coordinate systems;

2.6 Physics: energy can be transferred through a variety of mechanisms and in any change some energy is lost as heat (for example: conduction, convection, radiation, motion, electricity, chemical bonding changes) 4b. Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: deriving and using methods to measure perimeter, area, and volume of regular and irregular geometric figures;
2.7. Physics: light and sound waves have distinct properties; frequency, wavelengths and amplitude 4d. Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: using trigonometric ratios in problem-solving situations (for example, finding the height of a building from a given point, if the distance to the building and the angle of elevation are known).
2.9. Physics: Newton’s Three Laws of Motion explain the relationship between the forces acting on an object, the object’s mass, and changes in its motion 4e. Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: deducing properties of figures using vectors;
Life Science

 

4.2 Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: connect mathematical concepts from across the standards with their geometric representations;
3.11 Cell Biology: DNA has a general structure and function and a role in heredity and protein synthesis (for example: replication of DNA and the role of RNA in protein synthesis) 4.3 Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: recognize, draw, describe, and analyze geometric shapes in one, two, and three dimensions;
Earth and Space Science

 

4.4 Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: make, investigate, and test conjectures about geometric ideas;
4.17. Solar System: the scales of size and separation of components of the solar system are complex
4b. Geometric concepts, properties, and relationships: deriving and using methods to measure perimeter, area, and volume of regular and irregular geometric figures;

Nature of Science involves a particular way of building knowledge and making

 

Mathematical Reasoning

 

5.2 Argument: the scientific way of knowing uses a critique and consensus process (for example: peer review, openness to criticism, logical arguments, skepticism)

1.2 Number sense and problem solving: represent and use numbers in a variety of equivalent forms (for example, fractions, decimals, percents, exponents, scientific notation);

5.3 Analysis: graphs, equations or other models are used to analyze systems involving change and constancy (for example: comparing the geologic time scale to shorter time frame, exponential growth, a mathematical expression for gas behavior; constructing a closed ecosystem 1.3. Number sense and problem solving: know the structure and properties of the real number system (for example, primes, factors, multiples, relationships among sets of numbers);

5.5. Analysis: scientific knowledge changes and accumulates over time; usually the changes that take place are small modifications of prior knowledge but major shifts in the scientific view of how the world works do occur

1.4. Number sense and problem solving: use number sense, including estimation and mental arithmetic, to determine the reasonableness of solutions.
5.6. Analysis: interrelationships among science, technology and human activity lead to further discoveries that impact the world in positive and negative ways

5b. Tools and techniques to measure: selecting and using appropriate techniques and tools to measure quantities in order to achieve specified degrees of precision, accuracy, and error (or tolerance) of measurements; and
5.7 Analysis: there is a difference between a scientific theory and a scientific hypothesis

5.2 Tools and techniques to measure: make and use direct and indirect measurements to describe and compare real-world phenomena;

 

 

5.3 Tools and techniques to measure: understand the structure and use of systems of measurement;
    6b. Computational techniques, including estimation, mental arithmetic, paper-and-pencil, calculators, and computers: selecting and using appropriate methods for computing with real numbers in problem-solving situations from among mental arithmetic, estimation, paper-and-pencil, calculator, and computer methods, and determining whether the results are reasonable;
    6c. Computational techniques, including estimation, mental arithmetic, paper-and-pencil, calculators, and computers: describing the limitations of estimation, and assessing the amount of error resulting from estimation within acceptable limits.

 

 

Probability / Statistics

 

    3h. Data collection and analysis, statistics, and probability: testing hypotheses using appropriate statistics

    3.1 Data collection and analysis, statistics, and probability: solve problems by systematically collecting, organizing, describing, and analyzing data using surveys, tables, charts, and graphs
    3.2 Data collection and analysis, statistics, and probability: make valid inferences, decisions, and arguments based on data analysis;

Design Process

Student Response

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